High-Fiber Diets

The Fiber35 Diet is a diet that is based on eating only 35 grams of fiber a day. Developed by Brenda Watson and Leonard Smith, the purpose of the Fiber35 Diet is to help people maintain their goal weight, achieve weight loss goals and reduce their risk of developing high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes and other obesity-related conditions. Fiber was selected as the main ingredient of this diet for specific reasons. There are two kinds of fibers that are important for the human body; soluble and insoluble fiber. Insoluble fiber passes through various organs in the body, cleansing as it goes and is not absorbed. Soluble fiber stays in the body for longer periods of time, keeps metabolism busy and rids the body of heart, disease, cholesterol, etc. The diet also works based on the premise that fiber-rich foods help regulate blood sugar, control hunger and can even reduce the feeling of hunger. Because it makes the persons feel full, longer, it can help facilitate weight loss.

Food to include in the diet are:

  • Beans
  • Fruit
  • Dairy
  • Meat
  • Healthy oils
  • Fish
  • Eggs
  • Vegetables
  • Whole grains
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Poultry

Foods to avoid:

  • Trans fat
  • Processed foods
  • Refined grains
  • Sugar

It escapes digestion in the stomach and ends up reaching the gut. There, it feeds the friendly gut bacteria, leading to all sorts of health benefits.Fiber also promotes weight loss, lowers blood sugar levels and fights constipation.The recommended daily intake is 25 grams for women, and 38 grams for men. However, most people are only eating around half of that or 15-17 grams of fiber per day. The good news is that increasing fiber intake is relatively simple. Here is a list of high-fiber foods.

Good Fiber Sources

Pears

The pear is a popular type of fruit that is both tasty and nutritious. It is one of the best fruit sources of fiber. The majority of the fiber is found in the skin which is of favorable taste and texture.

Fiber content: 5.5 grams in a medium-sized pear, or 3.1 grams per 100 grams.

Strawberries

Strawberries are incredibly delicious and among the most nutrient-dense fruits, you can find. They are loaded with vitamin C, manganese and all sorts of powerful antioxidants. Strawberries make a healthy contribution to your daily fiber intake.

Fiber content: 3 grams in a cup, or 2 grams per 100 grams. This is very high given the low-calorie content of strawberries.

Avocado

The avocado is different from most fruits. Instead of being high in carbohydrates, it is loaded with healthy fats. Avocados are very high in vitamin C, potassium, magnesium, vitamin E and B-vitamins. They also are an excellent source of dietary fiber, particularly insoluble fibers.

Fiber content: 10 grams in a cup, or 6.7 grams per 100 grams.

Apples

Apples are among the most satisfying foods you can eat and they make a convenient and easy to carry snack. They are also relatively high in fiber. The fiber found in apples can be combined with other nutrients in the apple to provide a number of health benefits.

Fiber content: 4.4 grams in a medium-sized apple, or 2.4 grams per 100 grams.

Raspberries

Raspberries are highly nutritious berries with a beautiful red hue. They are packed with fiber, some of which is soluble fiber in the form of pectin which aids in lowering cholesterol. Raspberries are also high in Vitamin C.

Fiber content: A cup contains 8 grams of fiber, with 6.5 grams per 100 grams.

Bananas

Bananas are a good source of many nutrients, including vitamin C, vitamin B6 and potassium. Additionally, the fiber that it provides, in the form of soluble fiber, is associated with decreasing the risk of heart disease. A green or unripe banana also contains a significant amount of resistant starch, a type of indigestible carbohydrate that functions like fiber.

Fiber content: 3.1 grams in a medium-sized banana, or 2.6 grams per 100 grams.

Carrots

The carrot is a root vegetable that is tasty, crunchy and highly nutritious. It is full of fiber, both soluble and insoluble. The carrot is also high in vitamin K, vitamin B6, magnesium and beta-carotene, which is an antioxidant that gets turned into vitamin A in the body.

Fiber content: 3.4 grams in a cup, or 2.8 grams per 100 grams. This is very high considering the low caloric value of carrots.

Beets

The beet, or beetroot, is a root vegetable that is high in various important nutrients, such as folate, iron, copper, manganese and potassium. Beets are a good sourse of fiber and contain the same amount of fiber whether eaten raw or cooked. They are also loaded with inorganic nitrates which are nutrients shown to have various benefits related to blood pressure regulation and exercise performance.

Fiber content: 3.8 grams per cup, or 2.8 grams per 100 grams.

Broccoli

Broccoli is a type of cruciferous vegetable and is one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet. Along with fiber, it is loaded with vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, B vitamins, potassium, iron and manganese, and contains antioxidants and potent cancer-fighting nutrients. Broccoli is also relatively high in protein compared to most vegetables.

Fiber content: 2.4 grams per cup, or 2.6 grams per 100 grams.

Artichoke

The artichoke is a powerhouse vegetable. It is one of the world’s best sources of fiber, making it one of the best vegetables for not only keeping you regular but also improving digestive health.

Fiber content: 6.9 grams in an artichoke, or 5.4 grams per 100 grams.

Brussels Sprouts

The Brussels sprout is a type of cruciferous vegetable that is related to broccoli. Brussels sprouts are very high in vitamin K, potassium, folate and potent cancer-fighting antioxidants. Adding a few Brussel sprouts into your diet can do wonders for your health.

Fiber content: 3.3 grams per cup, or 3.8 grams per 100 grams.

Other High-Fiber Vegetables

Pretty much all vegetables contain significant amounts of fiber. Other notable examples include kale, spinach, and tomatoes.

Lentils

Lentils are inexpensive and are among the most nutritious foods on earth. They are very high in protein and loaded with all sorts of important nutrients. In addition to fiber, they are one of the top ten sources of folate.

Fiber content: 15.6 grams per cup of cooked lentils, or 7.9 per 100 grams.

Kidney Beans

Kidney beans are a popular type of legume. Like other legumes, they are loaded with plant-based protein and various nutrients. They are a good source of fiber and can aid in lowering cholesterol as well as stabilizing blood sugar levels.

Fiber content: 11.3 grams per cup of cooked beans, or 6.4 per 100 grams.

Split Peas

Split peas are made from the dried, split and peeled seeds of peas. They can be used as the main ingredient for nutrient-dense meals. Split peas contain fibers that will benefit your cardiovascular system and lower cholesterol levels.

Fiber content: 16.3 grams per cup of cooked split peas, or 8.3 per 100 grams.

Chickpeas

The chickpea is another type of legume that is loaded with nutrients, including minerals and protein. You may know them as garbanzo beans, and they contain both soluble and insoluble fiber. They contain high levels of protein as well Fiber content: 12.5 grams per cup of cooked chickpeas, or 7.6 per 100 grams. Other High-Fiber Legumes Most legumes are high in protein, fiber and all sorts of nutrients.

Fiber content: 12.5 grams per cup of cooked chickpeas, or 7.6 per 100 grams.

Other High-Fiber Legumes Most legumes are high in protein, fiber and all sorts of nutrients. When properly prepared, they are among the world’s least expensive sources of quality nutrition. Other high-fiber legumes include black beans, edamame, lima beans and baked beans.

Quinoa

Quinoa is one of the most protein-rich foods we can eat and has gained increasing popularity over the last few years. It also has almost twice the fiber as most other grains. This quick-cooking grain is known as “the mother grain” because of its nutrient-density, including protein, magnesium, iron, zinc, potassium, and antioxidants, to name a few.

Fiber content: 1.6 grams per cup of cooked quinoa, or 2.8 per 100 grams.

Oats

Oats may be the healthiest grain food on the planet. They are a good source of soluble and insoluble fiber. They contain a powerful soluble fiber called beta-glucan, which has major beneficial effects on blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Oats are a beneficial addition to any diet because they provide other important vitamins and minerals as well.

Fiber content: 16.5 grams per cup of raw oats, or 10.6 grams per 100 grams.

Popcorn

Popcorn is one of the best snacks you can eat when trying to increase your fiber intake. Air-popped popcorn is very high in fiber, calorie for calorie. Remember that adding a lot of fat (ex: butter) can greatly reduce the fiber/calorie ratio. Fiber content: 14.5 grams per 100 grams. Almonds The almond is a popular type of tree nut. Almonds are very high in many nutrients, including healthy fats, vitamin E,

Fiber content: 14.5 grams per 100 grams. Almonds The almond is a popular type of tree nut. Almonds are very high in many nutrients, including healthy fats, vitamin E, manganese, and magnesium.

Popcorn is one of the best snacks you can eat when trying to increase your fiber intake. Air-popped popcorn is very high in fiber, calorie for calorie. Remember that adding a lot of fat (ex: butter) can greatly reduce the fiber/calorie ratio. Fiber content: 14.5 grams per 100 grams.

Almonds

The almond is a popular type of tree nut. Almonds are very high in many nutrients, including healthy fats, vitamin E, manganese, and magnesium. They are also lower in calories and fat than some other nuts such as walnuts but carry more potassium and protein.

Fiber content: 3.5 grams per ounce, or 12.5 grams per 100 grams.

Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are tiny black seeds that are immensely popular in the natural food community. They are highly nutritious, with lots of magnesium, phosphorus, calcium, and magnesium and may also be the single best source of fiber on the planet. These seeds can also help you feel fuller longer contributing to weight loss. Fiber content: 10 grams per ounce, or 34.4 grams per 100 grams.

Other High-Fiber Nuts and Seeds Most nuts and seeds contain significant amounts of fiber. This includes coconuts, pistachios, walnuts, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds.

Sweet Potatoes

The sweet potato is very and has a delicious sweet flavor that can be enjoyed all year round. It is very high in beta-carotene, B-vitamins, and various minerals. Sweet potatoes are not only high in fiber but contain other health beneficial nutrients.

Fiber content: A medium-sized boiled sweet potato (without skin) contains 3.8 grams of fiber or 2.5 grams per 100 grams

Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate is arguably one of the world’s most delicious foods. It is also surprisingly high in nutrients and is among the most antioxidant-rich and nutrient-dense foods on the planet. When choosing dark chocolate, it is important to remember to choose ones that are high in cocoa (70-95% or higher) and not those laden with sugar.

Fiber content: 3.1 grams in a 1-ounce piece, or 10.9 grams per 100 grams.

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